About your Search

20121006
20121014
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
as it seems? erika miller takes a closer look at the data and what it says about the u.s. economy. >> reporter: 3-tenths of a percent does not seem like much. but, when it comes to the nation's unemployment rate, a 3- tenths of a percent drop is actually staggering. the unemployment rate now stands at 7.8 percent. that's the lowest level since january 2009, when president obama took office. even more remarkable is the reason for the drop. >> the unemployment rate decline was not because people dropped out of the labor force. to the contrary. the labor force actually but the household survey estimate of employment increased even more. >> reporter: the household survey shows total employment rose by 873,000. that's the biggest gain since ronald reagan was president. but there's a catch. two-thirds of those jobs are part-time positions, taken because no full-time work was available. and there's another troubling sign: >> what we have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of posi
're in a very slow economy. so i think that in this particular third-quarter earnings period the chance of a good surprise, a meaningful good surprise or a meaningful disappointment, it's pretty low. the street expects poor earnings comparison. that is what we're going to get. whether you are a couple percent decline or a couple percent gain. it's really not that much different. so it's looking ahead. remember earnings are a trailing indicator. >> so are we going to get a surprise or a disappointment you think from alcoa. everybody looks at this as setting thtone for trading as you mentioned. it will be the first dow component to report. it also when you look at the company, it has businesses in autos, aerospace, packaging, construction, so it is kind of a bellwether for the economy. what will those alcoa earnings tell us. >> well, alcoa reports first all the time, obviously. and i don't think that is a good idea to use that as a bellwether for earnings. think of the sector that alcoa is in. materials are going to have some was comparisons, really, energy and materials are going to be t
's helping the economy make a comeback. a "set back" for stocks, on investor jitters about the global economy. the major averages are now in negative territory for october. is this a buying opportunity or time to take profits? and toyota, once known for quality, announces yetnother major recall. does this make toyota less popular with consumers? that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! the nation's housing market appears to be building a new foundation. that's according to the latest snapshot of the u.s. economy released today by the federal reserve. the so-called "beige book" compiles data from 12 fed districts, and it shows residential real estate improved in "all" districts in september. anecdotes from business contacts and economists noted existg home sales strengthened, while prices rose or stayed stable. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at whether the broader economy is also showing signs of strength. >> reporter: here's a shocker: the u.s. economy is growing, but only at modest pace. that's what anecdotes, not hard numbers, from the fed's regional banks suggest about the business climate. 1
what one expert thinks. >> susie: american consumers are feeling pretty good about the economy. the university of michigan's latest reading on consumer sentiment hit a five-year high. that comes as the treasury reports the u.s. budget deficit topped $1 trillion in fiscal 2012. that's our fourth-largest budget deficit since world war two. that held wall street's gains in check: the dow rose 2.5 points, the nasdaq fell five. the s&p down four. for the week, the major averages were all off more than 2%. the nasdaq was hit the worst, down almost 3%. giov >> i think it's very hard to predict real estate prices now because the world is in such an unusual situation. there are so many ifs. and because we just recovered from the biggest housing bubble in u.s. history. so we're really in uncharted territory right now. >> reporter: shiller says one problem for the housing market is there is really no sense of urgency for potential home buyers to pull the trigger on a purchase. interest rates are expected to remain low for the foreseeable future and housing prices really aren't rising that
into the economy they are 12i78ity-- stimulating housing. citi has problem relating to housing. they are stimulating emerging markets where citi is the strongest. >> all right, let's take a look at some of your other picks besides citi. you like goldman sachs. you have been telling us this all year. and the regional bank suntrust. again, was's the attraction? >> suntrust again is in the southeast. it has continued to have credit problems later than a lot of the other banks. but that's been a bad thingment but now we think it's a good thing. because right now we can still see a lot of positive improvements as we start to see a pick up in the economy and housing and places like florida, can help move that stock back up. so we still like suntrust. >> we just have about 45$p)-sec. a new round of bank stress tests coming up. how do you think banks are going to do. are they strong enough to withstand a financial downturn? >> well, i think they're strong enough. the question is does the fed think they're strong enough. and that is what we will find out. i think it will be a tough time
is the first dow component to report earnings, and is considered a bellwether of how the economy is faring. the stock barely budged in the regular session, closing at $9.13 a share, and was up a few pennies after hours. we're happy to have with us now alcoa c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld. >> welcome back to nightly business report. baseed on how alcoa did in the third quarter, how do you think business will be for you for the rest of this year and going into 2013? >> well, it's a miktsed word out there. there's a lot of volatility. we see in the end markets that we confirm, the aluminum market is going to be about growth six percent. we took is down a notch from seven percent. as you just said, this is a decade where aluminum demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commerc
will slug it out on the economy, medicare and taxes. they may be number two on the ticket, but these men hope they can make this another crucial turning point in an election that is now almost a dd heat darren gersh reports. >> reporter: vice-presidential debates are often more entertaining than important, but not this time. joe biden will be trying to beat back the romney bump from the first presidential debate; and paul ryan will be working to stretch mitt romney's debate double into a home run. >> if ryan does really, really well, it could possibly fundamentally make this a real horse race, not just nationally but in the battleground states. so, i think there is a lot of expectation on both sides for what this debate possible could do. >> reporter: if you thought the first presidential debate was bogg down in stastics and policy details, you'll have more fun tonight. debate veterans are expecting fireworks. jeff nesbit was press secretary for former vice-president dan quayle. >> while both of them can go deep on wonky politics-- biden can go pretty deep on foreign policy and ryan can
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)